Education facilities – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 17:50:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://woodrosealumnae.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T214900.103.png Education facilities – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ 32 32 Cameron University Teams Up with Marie Detty Youth & Family Services for Continuing Education Workshop Focuses on Family Violence | Community https://woodrosealumnae.org/cameron-university-teams-up-with-marie-detty-youth-family-services-for-continuing-education-workshop-focuses-on-family-violence-community/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/cameron-university-teams-up-with-marie-detty-youth-family-services-for-continuing-education-workshop-focuses-on-family-violence-community/ Licensed Professional Counselors and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists in Southwest Oklahoma seeking continuing education opportunities will be able to earn up to six hours of continuing education credits during “Domestic Violence: Creating an Ethical Therapeutic Environment. “. The one-day training session will be presented by the Department of Psychology at Cameron University in partnership […]]]>

Licensed Professional Counselors and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists in Southwest Oklahoma seeking continuing education opportunities will be able to earn up to six hours of continuing education credits during “Domestic Violence: Creating an Ethical Therapeutic Environment. “.

The one-day training session will be presented by the Department of Psychology at Cameron University in partnership with Marie Detty Youth & Family Services, on Friday, October 29, in the Johnson Auditorium, located at Ross Hall, on the south side of the Cameron University campus in Lawton. As the number of places is limited, registration is compulsory. Virtual presence is also available.

The cost to participate and earn CEUs is $ 100. There is no charge for those who wish to attend without obtaining continuing education credits. Go to https://www.cameron.edu/psychology/events to register.

Many professionals have expressed concerns about working with clients who are either actively in a domestic violence relationship or who have a history of domestic violence relationships. Many times these clients may have many layers of relationship trauma, family history, and / or court system trauma. This population often lacks a support system due to the isolation resulting from the abuse and is unsure of their rights and next steps. Best practices and quality of care are touchstones that professionals can use to contribute to a coordinated community response to end violence and abuse.

The program of the event is as follows:

8:30 am Arrival

9 a.m. Session I: Shanti Hubbard and Paul James, presenters

Definitions and statistics; the impacts of domestic violence trauma on adults, adolescents and children; the risk of lethality associated with judicial families; considerations for supervision with respect to informed consent, consultation / collaboration with other providers and funding for families in crisis.

12:15 Lunch (free)

1 p.m. Sessions II: Michelle Amerson and Kyle Cabelka, presenters

Power and control in the therapeutic relationship; risk of lethality associated with judicial families; ethical considerations relating to client access to records; and overcoming obstacles faced by clinicians, such as providing factual testimony in civil and / or criminal court.

4:30 p.m. End of training

About the presenters:

Michelle Amerson, MS, LMFT-S, is Assistant Clinical Director of the Marie Detty Youth and Family Service Center. A former member of the Oklahoma Army National Guard, Amerson resigned his commission as a military intelligence officer to pursue his clinical career. She received a Master of Science in Behavioral Science from Cameron University in 2014. In addition to providing therapy, Amerson conducts training for youth, law enforcement and other professionals on a wide range of topics such as domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse. and trauma-informed care. She has provided expert testimony and / or consultation in cases ranging from domestic violence to obscene assault, sex trafficking and other cases involving physical or sexual abuse against adults and children.

Kyle Cabelka is District Attorney, 5th District Attorneys, for Comanche and Cotton Counties. He was appointed to this post in August 2021 by Governor Kevin Stitt. Cabelka has worked in this district attorney’s office since he was in Oklahoma City University Law School. After obtaining his JD in 2013, he continued his career there as an assistant district attorney until 2016, when he was promoted to first assistant. In this capacity, Cabelka prosecuted crimes and misdemeanors and advised elected officials from Comanche and Cotton counties on legal issues related to their duties. He led the Comanche County multidisciplinary team, formed under state law, to protect children from abuse, and organized and participated in diversion programs spanning mental health and the courts of drug addiction, among other areas.

Shanti Hubbard, MS, LPC candidate, is a Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Advisor at Marie Detty New Directions. A graduate of Cameron University, Hubbard helps write victim impact statements, prepare for court, and build the confidence needed for self-advocacy through individual, group and family counseling as part of a program. certified from the Attorney General’s Office. She has extensive experience and specific training in providing victim services to families who are victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and criminal harassment in both residential and non-residential settings.

Paul James, MS, LPC, is a licensed supervisor in the state of Oklahoma. A faculty member in the Department of Psychology at Cameron University, he directs the counseling program and teaches numerous graduate courses. James is also Co-Director of the Cameron Psychology Clinic. He received a Master of Science in Counseling Psychology from Southern Nazarene University and is currently a doctoral student in Counselor Education and Supervision at Oregon State University. James has experience in private practice, community clinics, emergency shelters, and inpatient treatment centers across Oklahoma. Her experience as a counselor at Wings of Hope Family Crisis Services in Stillwater, Oklahoma, made her aware of the critical nature of domestic violence and advocacy for sexual assault. This is manifested in her passion for educating counseling students on the critical importance of trauma-informed and client-centered care.

For more information on this continuing education workshop, contact Marie Detty Youth & Family Services at 580-248-6450.

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Construction of schools, key COVID issues in Beavercreek school board race https://woodrosealumnae.org/construction-of-schools-key-covid-issues-in-beavercreek-school-board-race/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 08:44:08 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/construction-of-schools-key-covid-issues-in-beavercreek-school-board-race/ Each candidate was asked to name one or two of the most important issues the district will face in the years to come. Everyone except Passage mentioned the growth in enrollment and the possibility of new schools being built as one of their main issues. In 2019, the school board approved a facilities master plan […]]]>

Each candidate was asked to name one or two of the most important issues the district will face in the years to come. Everyone except Passage mentioned the growth in enrollment and the possibility of new schools being built as one of their main issues.

In 2019, the school board approved a facilities master plan that called for the construction of a new high school while retaining the existing buildings, in order to create more space. The plan would require voters to approve a tax issue, and it was suspended after the COVID hit.

Rigano said the temporarily used trailer classrooms are “not what we want for our students,” but district leaders need to “constantly monitor the situation and make adjustments” for now.

To explore2019 story: Beavercreek schools decide on facilities plan

Fischer said the facilities master plan is “not something we can ignore for long,” adding that the plan must be sustainable over the long term and clear enough for the community to support it.

Lindsay disagreed that new buildings were urgently needed, suggesting that population growth will be lower than the district expects. She said redistributing or using improved trailers might be better than asking taxpayers millions of dollars to build a new high school.

Hunt said Beavercreek has put a lot of time and effort into the facilities plan and she hopes the district can start moving again, rather than using temporary “band-aid” approaches.

COVID protocols

Lindsay and Passage have both put COVID issues at the top of their lists, as the district currently enforces masks for everyone in Kindergarten to Grade 12. Focusing on “parental rights,” Passage said it would propose a new regulation preventing the school board from requiring “any medical device or medication.”

Lindsay said cover mask warrants hurt families and children fall behind in school when healthy children are quarantined. She said families told her stories about their children having rashes on their faces and getting sick from the masks. She argued that the risk of COVID is low for most children and that there is “too much emphasis on the mask’s ability to actually protect students.”

To exploreSeptember: Residents voice their opinions on the mask’s mandate

Rigano said she believes in masking and will continue to follow the recommendations of medical experts. County and state health officials recommend masks in K-12 schools, and the CDC says the masks reduce the spread of virus-laden droplets when people talk, cough and sneeze.

Fischer said the schools’ decision to follow expert advice is the best course of action and has enabled Beavercreek to “keep schools open and keep children healthy.”

Hunt said she was resistant to the district’s mask policy but did not fight it because wearing masks is what keeps children in school rather than quarantining themselves, and she said it is crucial that children have face-to-face classes.

Other issues

** Fischer: An electrical engineer and parent of current Beavercreek students, Fischer said improving school diversity and inclusion efforts was a top priority for him, to make every student feel welcome. “It really has to do with helping our kids respect and understand each other and understand their differences,” he said.

In other areas, Fischer said the district needs to explain school funding to the public in a more understandable way. He wants schools to be empowered to try new things, like project-based learning, to keep pace with a changing economy. He would like to see an emphasis on practical skills, including financial literacy and information literacy. He said that through his job he is used to managing large programs and guiding teams to run efficiently.

To explorePrevious: Beavercreek had considered major budget cuts

** Hunt: A church ministry assistant, parent of current students, and an eight-year school board member, Hunt’s focus is character education, helping to launch the Shine Awards for character students each month. “It values ​​being a good citizen and a good friend, being responsible and respectful of others, including those who might be left behind,” she said.

Hunt said teachers are doing important work to meet the needs of children behind in school after 18 months of COVID-related disruption. She said there were no glaring issues with the budget and cited recent multi-million dollar savings resulting from health plan changes.

** Rigano: A retired teacher and eight-year school board member, Rigano said she believes the schools in Beavercreek are doing an “exceptional job” in preparing children for their adult futures, in large part due to the diversity courses to take and opportunities to participate. .

She thinks the district budget is in a good position, and she would not call for significant changes in the way they spend their money. But she said state funding is still a concern. She said she was a good candidate because her decades of educational experience helped her master education issues from elementary to college level.

** Lindsay: A parent of five (four current Beavercreek students), Lindsay said she believes Beavercreek schools and teachers are doing a good job academically and with enrichment programs, especially compared to schools in Beavercreek. ‘other states where her husband has been deployed.

When asked if she could complete a four-year term on the school board, given her husband’s deployment status in the military, Lindsay said she has over two years left here and the moment it is not certain what the family would do next.

On “Critical Race Theory:” said Lindsay: “You can call it CRT or justice-centered learning or diversity, equity and inclusion… theory, it has no place in our public education K- 12.

** Passage: A civilian employee of the US Air Force, he cited transparency and accountability as his other top priorities for the district. He said he wanted to review all school curricula individually “to locate the waste.”

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NIKA Secures $ 39 Million Order for USACE MFSS II Contract to Support Defense Health Agency Facilities Business https://woodrosealumnae.org/nika-secures-39-million-order-for-usace-mfss-ii-contract-to-support-defense-health-agency-facilities-business/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/nika-secures-39-million-order-for-usace-mfss-ii-contract-to-support-defense-health-agency-facilities-business/ ROCKVILLE, Maryland., October 7, 2021 / PRNewswire / – NIKA, a global provider of facility lifecycle solutions, received an $ 39 million Facility Support Task Order by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Huntsville Center under its Medical Facilities Support Services (MFSS) II IDIQ contract. As part of this work order, NIKA will provide Corporate […]]]>

ROCKVILLE, Maryland., October 7, 2021 / PRNewswire / – NIKA, a global provider of facility lifecycle solutions, received an $ 39 million Facility Support Task Order by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Huntsville Center under its Medical Facilities Support Services (MFSS) II IDIQ contract. As part of this work order, NIKA will provide Corporate Support of Defense Health Agency (DHA-FE) facilities to hundreds of military medical treatment facilities (MTF) Air, Army, and Navy worldwide to operate and maintain their facilities to meet Military Health System (MHS) facility support requirements.

This work order integrates multiple services under a single contract in order to efficiently provide DHA-FE with the expertise necessary to support Department of Defense (DoD) medical missions in wartime and peacetime. It also supports the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) initiative to create a more integrated healthcare system globally to foster shared services across the enterprise. NIKA will provide project management, engineering operations, sustainment, restoration and modernization (SRM), facility support and aseptic management services for military health facilities on the continent United States (CONUS) and outside the continent United States (OCONUS).

This multidisciplinary contract will be led by Ms. Danishia Barton, Director of Engineering and Program Management at NIKA. “I am excited about the opportunity to leverage NIKA’s intimate knowledge of medical facility operations partnering with DHA in the delivery of health care to our fighters and their families,” Ms. Barton said.

CEO / President of NIKA Kabir Chaudhary said the award builds on NIKA’s history of supporting critical DoD facilities around the world.

“We look forward to expanding our support for DHA-FE initiatives as we integrate our vast capabilities to support these critical global facilities. It is a privilege to continue our ten-year support for DHA and its mission,” Chaudhary said.

About NIKA

NIKA provides comprehensive services and solutions to support the full lifecycle of facilities. For more than two decades, the Department of Defense and federal civil agencies, as well as commercial and higher education institutions, have trusted NIKA to operate and manage their real estate. Our operations management, engineering and project management services provide our clients with the value and expertise necessary to ensure operational readiness of complex and critical facilities. Based at Rockville, Maryland with offices in San Antonio, Texas, NIKA helps customers improve their operational excellence around the world.

For more information on NIKA, please visit http://www.nikasolutions.com.

For more information, contact:
Rosanna Cruz
[email protected]
(301) 770-3520
www.nikasolutions.com

SOURCE NIKA

Related links

https://www.nikasolutions.com/

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Education ministry can’t stop schools from using COVID funds for sports facilities https://woodrosealumnae.org/education-ministry-cant-stop-schools-from-using-covid-funds-for-sports-facilities/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 17:32:48 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/education-ministry-cant-stop-schools-from-using-covid-funds-for-sports-facilities/ In Wisconsin, one school district built a new football field and another in Iowa renovated a high school weight room. Two outdoor tracks get a facelift at a Kentucky school, all thanks to billions of dollars in federal pandemic assistance for schools that Congress passed this year. The $ 123 billion cash injection was intended […]]]>

In Wisconsin, one school district built a new football field and another in Iowa renovated a high school weight room. Two outdoor tracks get a facelift at a Kentucky school, all thanks to billions of dollars in federal pandemic assistance for schools that Congress passed this year.

The $ 123 billion cash injection was intended to allow schools to reopen safely and recover costs related to the pandemic. However, a lack of explicit guidelines on how the money can be spent has led some districts to appropriate these funds for expensive sports projects, the Associated Press has found.

Democratic Representative Bobby Scott of Virginia, who heads the United States House Education Committee, said athletics shouldn’t be a priority at the expense of academics. He added that the funding is for students and not for sports programs.

“I suspect you can stand up for anything, but the point is clear: it’s to open safely, to stay open safely, and to deal with the loss of learning,” Scott said. “These are targeted resources needed to address the fact that a lot of kids just haven’t accomplished much for about a year.”

For more Associated Press reporting, see below.

Fans fill the stadium at Whitewater High School football field on Friday, October 1, 2021 in Whitewater, Wisconsin. A growing number of school districts in the United States are using federal pandemic funding for athletic projects. When Whitewater school officials learned they would get $ 2 million in pandemic relief this year, they decided to put the bulk of it aside to cover the costs of their current budget, freeing up 1 , $ 6 million in local funding used to build new artificial turf fields for football, baseball and softball.
Morry Gash / AP Photo

Critics said it violated the intent of the legislation, which was aimed at helping students catch up after months of distance learning. But many schools argue that the projects support students’ physical and mental health, one of the goals authorized by the federal government.

Robin Lake, director of the Center on Reinventing Public Education, said every pandemic relief dollar spent on sports could be used to expand tutoring, reduce class sizes and take other steps to help students who have academic difficulties.

“Can these districts show that all of their kids are ready to graduate by the end of this year – college and career ready?” ” she said. “If not, then stop the construction. Stop it now.”

In some parts of the country, exercise equipment companies have attempted to capitalize, reaching out to coaches and school superintendents to suggest improvements.

It is impossible to know exactly how many schools are using pandemic relief for athletics. Districts are required to tell states how they spend the money, but some schools use local funding for sports projects and then replace it with federal relief money – a move that bypasses reporting requirements.

The funding is part of the US bailout package signed in March by President Joe Biden that sent money to schools, giving larger shares to the poorest people. This is the latest in several rounds of funding that Congress has funneled to states to meet education needs. The PA has tracked more than $ 157 billion distributed to school districts nationwide so far.

Schools have great flexibility in how they use the money, but only three years to spend it, a deadline that has led some to seek quick purchases that won’t need ongoing funding once the money is out. federal exhausted.

When school officials in Whitewater, Wisconsin learned they were going to receive $ 2 million in pandemic relief this year, they decided to use most of it to cover their current budget, freeing up $ 1.6 million in local funding to build new artificial turf fields for football, baseball and softball.

Athletics officials in the 1,800 student district said the project was badly needed to replace the heavily flooded grounds. They presented federal money as a chance to solve the problem without asking local taxpayers for funding.

“If we don’t do it now with that money, I don’t know when we would do something like this,” athletic director Justin Crandall told the school board in May. “I don’t see us being a district that would go to a referendum for turf pitches.”

Two school board members objected, one of them worrying that only $ 400,000 was being used to address student learning loss – the minimum to meet a requirement that at least 20 percent is dedicated to this goal.

The board approved the plan despite these objections and the new football pitch was inaugurated in September. District Superintendent Caroline Pate-Hefty declined to answer questions about the project.

In the Roland-Story Community School District in Iowa, there were no objections when the school board voted in May to use $ 100,000 in pandemic relief for the renovation of a weight room in high school. This allowed the district to double its weightlifting platforms to 12 and add new flooring with personalized branding for the school.

Superintendent Matt Patton called this a “major improvement in health and safety,” saying new floors can be sanitized more easily. He said most of the district’s federal assistance was spent on other costs, including a full-time mental health therapist, special education teachers and expanded summer learning options.

Like many others in rural Iowa, the district of about 1,000 students has attempted to return to normal functioning: it’s the return to full in-person learning and, just weeks before approving the overhaul. from the weight room, gave up a mask mandate.

The project is seen as a godsend for wrestlers and the football team, which recently boasted that 39 players had completed more than 3,300 off-season training sessions. The old material will be used at the college.

“More kids will be able to lift at the same time with better equipment,” said high school wrestling coach Leland Schwartz. “Every time we can provide more opportunities for our athletes, those athletes will get better, which makes all of our programs better.”

The East Lyme, Connecticut School Board recently approved a plan to direct some of its federal relief towards annual operating costs, freeing up $ 175,000 to renovate a poorly drained baseball field. Some board members called for swift action to get the job done in time for the spring games.

In September, the Pulaski County School Board in Kentucky allocated $ 1 million in pandemic assistance to resurface two outdoor runways. Superintendent Patrick Richardson called it a federally funded health and wellness project, saying it “will allow our students to be taken for mask breaks, by class, in an environment sure”.

Among education advocates, sports spending is seen as a breakdown at all levels of government.

Federal officials did not provide clear funding guidelines, while state education departments did not control their schools’ spending, said Terra Wallin, associate director of the Education Trust. She also asked if the districts’ spending on athletics took into account what was best for the students.

Wallin said the US Department of Education should issue new guidelines and intervene before more districts make similar decisions.

“There will be districts next spring that will consider things like this,” she said. “There is still time to influence them and make sure the districts are doing the right thing.”

In a statement, the Education Ministry said it had made it clear that the funding was to be used for “reasonable and necessary” expenses in response to the pandemic. He said there is “a lot of evidence” that districts are using relief supplies to keep schools safe, including increasing access to vaccines, implementing virus testing and improving health care systems. ventilation.

“We continue to strongly encourage each district to use these funds to help address these issues, including using our back-to-school roadmap and providing guidance on how to use these funds,” he said. declared the department.

So far, there has been little pullback in sports spending. In August, Illinois education officials rejected a school’s plan to use federal money for a football field. But other states say it’s not for them to challenge school spending decisions.

The Iowa Department of Education has approved the Roland-Story weight room project, saying federal guidelines allow “capital expenditures for special-purpose equipment.”

Heather Doe, spokesperson for the agency, said funding priorities are local decisions. The department does not have the power to reject a district’s expenses, she said, unless they are “definitely ineligible.”

In Congress, lawmakers from both parties say it is wrong to use the money for sports. Democrats say that’s not what it was intended for, while Republicans say it’s a sign it wasn’t necessary.

“Congress has allocated billions more than what the CDC has deemed necessary to reopen schools safely, paving the way for endemic waste and abuse,” said Representative Virginia Foxx of North Carolina, the highest Republican House Committee on Education and Work.

Meanwhile, fitness companies are multiplying the selling points.

Chad May, CEO of Commercial Fitness Equipment in Eugene, Ore., Said he does an average of five new school projects every week. So far, his company has supported $ 25 million worth of weight room upgrades funded by pandemic aid, he said.

Often the calls come from underfunded districts that want the kind of facilities that their wealthier peers have, May said. But some are just looking for ways to spend their federal relief within the three-year time frame.

The high school weight room redesign in Story City, Iowa is being done by Push Pedal Pull, a South Dakota company that is undertaking similar projects elsewhere in Iowa and Nebraska.

Luke Reiland, a representative for a company in Ames, Iowa, said he had called schools to let them know the funding could be used for those kinds of costs. He sees weight rooms and fitness centers as increasingly important to schools in small towns, as they seek to prevent students from leaving for larger districts.

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Emergency Response Team Helps California Schools Overcome Wildfires https://woodrosealumnae.org/emergency-response-team-helps-california-schools-overcome-wildfires/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:04:57 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/emergency-response-team-helps-california-schools-overcome-wildfires/ COURTESY OF THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Jake Wolf, a member of the California Department of Education’s emergency services team, monitors wildfires at the California Office of Emergency Services Sept. 14 during a visit from President Joe Biden. COURTESY OF THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Jake Wolf, a member of the California Department of Education’s […]]]>
COURTESY OF THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Jake Wolf, a member of the California Department of Education’s emergency services team, monitors wildfires at the California Office of Emergency Services Sept. 14 during a visit from President Joe Biden.

In the height of wildfire season, Joe Anderson and Jake Wolf have met virtually every Thursday morning. with exhausted and disoriented school principals whose campuses had been evacuated or destroyed by the wildfires raging in California.

The couple make up the emergency services team for the California Department of Education, but for some school district officials assisted by them, they and their principal, Juan Mireles, are affectionately referred to as the 3J’s.

The one-year team helps school officials communicate with state and federal agencies in an emergency, provides technical assistance on accessing government funds, connects them with needed resources, offers advice on how and when to reopen schools safely and help in any other way possible.

The team reached out to school officials needing help during the weekly call, which also included officials from the public school association, or when district leaders contacted them. They also monitored the fires and offered advice on evacuations when the flames got too close to schools.

“We relied on our three J’s to have these conversations about what we were going through,” said Plumas Unified Superintendent Terry Oestreich, whose district was evacuated and two schools closed in August due to the fire in Dixie. “They advised us not to speed up the process. We are dealing with the air quality, which was very bad, and we had a big cleaning to do in the building.

Oestreich first met the men in July when Tim Taylor, executive director of the Smalls School Districts Association of California, asked if he could invite them to join the virtual Plumas School District cabinet meeting. The district was under evacuation orders because of the fire, and the emergency services team wanted to make sure district officials understood how to handle the emergency.

“If you haven’t done it before, you just stop in your tracks and have no idea what you’re dealing with right now,” Oestreich said.

A week after the meeting, the Dixie Fire destroyed the town of Greenville in Plumas County, razing many of its homes and businesses, as well as a charter school site. Greenville High School and Greenville Elementary School suffered only minor damage but had to be closed due to safety risks from the fires, including the potential for toxins in the water supply.

Elementary students have been moved to a nearby Taylorsville school that had been closed ten years ago, and high school students have been sent to Quincy and Chester high schools – trips that can now take two hours due to fire damage, Oestreich said. . The Emergency Services team is currently helping the district and the charter school find cell phones to house their students in Taylorsville.

The California Department of Education formed the Emergency Services team last October to help schools deal with the combined emergencies of the Covid-19 pandemic, wildfires and planned power outages, caused when utilities cut off electricity to reduce the risk of fire.

“We have always noted the need to have dedicated resources to help us (with emergency management) as it takes a long time, and we all have our daily jobs to do,” said Mireles, who heads up the emergency services. ‘school and transport facilities. Division at the Ministry of Education. “That’s why we embarked on this adventure, to create a team that would help us and that would be dedicated to helping us in the emergency management work that we do. “

Wolf and Anderson both worked in the governor’s emergency services office before moving to the Department of Education. The two men live in counties in the foothills affected by forest fires.

“I have four kids in public school right now so it’s a little more rewarding for me to see the things we pay for my kids,” said Anderson, who lives in El Dorado County. where the Caldor fire burned more than 220,000 people. acres. “So I’m definitely invested, you know, in emergency management for schools, and that’s why I’m here. “

Courtesy of the California Department of Education

Joe Anderson is part of the California Department of Education’s emergency services team.

Wolf and Anderson had their busiest fire season yet with nearly 2 million acres burned in California this year. During that time, they taught dozens of districts how to navigate state and federal regulations, make financial claims, and meet local public health and public works requirements. They also advised them on who to contact for additional financial and emotional support.

Both team members are briefed several times a day by state agencies like the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and Cal Fire about wildfires or other hazards that can put school facilities, the staff and students at risk. Together, the agencies coordinate emergency responses.

When forest fires threaten communities, Wolf uses Geographic Information System maps to measure the distance between schools and a fire. If a forest fire gets too close or the air quality is too bad, the team contacts school officials so they can prepare and make sure everyone is evacuated.

Taletha Washburn, principal of Plumas Charter School, has been linked to Wolf after the charter school learning center in Greenville burned down. Now they are working together to find laptops to at least temporarily replace the classrooms lost in the fire. In the meantime, students attend school near Taylorsville, where the charter school has another school site.

Wolf sent air cleaners to school – high-powered air filtration systems that remove air pollution and environmental contaminants – and helped connect Washburn with agencies that can help support the school.

“It’s intimidating,” Washburn said of the loss of a school site. “There are a lot of weird new things to do when you’re in this position. Navigating the landscape of the support system is really intense.

Washburn says she’ll also need Wolf’s expertise as she begins to seek help from the federal and state governments to help replace the school.

Wolf says his goal, when schools are closed due to emergencies, is to get students back to school as soon as possible so that teachers can educate children and build relationships with them.

“I have an aunt who has now been a teacher for 34 years in the Gridley School District,” Wolf said. “I see the amount of effort and the amount of consideration she puts into being a teacher. And that really inspires me and what I do.

Wolf offered to help Sherri Morgan, principal of the Long Valley Charter School in the small town of Doyle in Lassen County, when the school got caught up in the fire at the Beckwourth Complex in July.

“He was an incredible wealth of knowledge,” she said. “I know the school and the education, but I have a lot of missing information regarding post-disaster response. He was awesome. I felt supported by him.

Morgan said Wolf had helped her understand the steps needed to clean the school after it was damaged by smoke and the need to have the air systems inspected. He also helped set up a local helpdesk at the school so residents could go there to meet with state and local agencies and insurance companies for help.

“It was so invaluable that the California Department of Education hired people to help in this way,” Morgan said. “It is sad and reassuring that they are here.”

For more reports like this click here to sign up for EdSource’s free daily email on the latest developments in education.

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Stoke High School invests in new sports facilities https://woodrosealumnae.org/stoke-high-school-invests-in-new-sports-facilities/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 15:30:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/stoke-high-school-invests-in-new-sports-facilities/ An Ipswich secondary school has invested in state-of-the-art sports equipment for students. This is part of an initiative to provide extracurricular activities at Stoke High School and allow students to try new sports and develop their skills. The main purchase was a new 5G soccer field. With football being one of the most popular sports […]]]>

An Ipswich secondary school has invested in state-of-the-art sports equipment for students.

This is part of an initiative to provide extracurricular activities at Stoke High School and allow students to try new sports and develop their skills.

The main purchase was a new 5G soccer field. With football being one of the most popular sports in school and an integral part of the curriculum, the students were eager to play their first game.

The school also purchased two Grand Master trampolines.


Stoke High School’s all-new 5G soccer field
– Credit: Stoke High School

Andrew Robinson, Principal of Stoke High School, said: “We are committed to providing our students with the best possible teaching, learning and enrichment opportunities, which are supported by our newly renovated athletic facilities.


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“These will allow our existing students access to a greater range of sports equipment, arrangements and opportunities, as well as being open to prospective students and families to try out as part of our open house.” Wednesday October 6.

“It’s great to see our students already embracing the new resources available to them, and we’re so excited to be sharing this with even more children and families this week.”

In addition, students will be able to play basketball on the outdoor courts, use the gym facilities and participate in an obstacle course club which grade 6 students from Halifax and Hillside Elementary are also invited to attend. join.

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New $ 100 million cancer center to be built at Our Lady of the Lake in Baton Rouge https://woodrosealumnae.org/new-100-million-cancer-center-to-be-built-at-our-lady-of-the-lake-in-baton-rouge/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 21:32:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/new-100-million-cancer-center-to-be-built-at-our-lady-of-the-lake-in-baton-rouge/ The Notre-Dame-du-Lac regional center plans to inaugurate a $ 100 million stand-alone, multidisciplinary cancer center next year, state and health officials said at a press conference on Monday. . The OLOL Cancer Institute will be built adjacent to the current footprint of the hospital and will house medical and surgical oncology practices, a center for […]]]>

The Notre-Dame-du-Lac regional center plans to inaugurate a $ 100 million stand-alone, multidisciplinary cancer center next year, state and health officials said at a press conference on Monday. .

The OLOL Cancer Institute will be built adjacent to the current footprint of the hospital and will house medical and surgical oncology practices, a center for chemotherapy, advanced imaging and diagnostics for treatment, education facilities and research and conference center.

“Physical, emotional and spiritual care is proven to play an important role in the diagnosis, treatment and survival of cancer,” said Scott Wester, CEO of OLOL. “We are delighted to bring all of these services together under one roof through our holistic approach to cancer therapy. ”

The hospital is finalizing a deal with an architectural firm experienced in building cancer centers, Wester said at a press conference on Monday.

“This is a game-changing announcement,” Governor John Bel Edwards said at the press conference. “Having world-class care here in Baton Rouge at this new facility is going to be a tremendous asset not only to Baton Rouge, but to our state. ”

Louisiana had the third highest cancer incidence in the United States in 2018, according to data from the National Cancer Institute.

The Institute will be headed by Dr Daniel Nuss.

“This is a historic investment in cancer care for the southern Gulf,” Nuss said. “Patients can have a new confidence that our advanced surgical treatment and hematology and oncology services can all be found here in our community and will serve as an easily accessible destination for those in the southern Gulf. ”

Edwards said he would push for the center to get accreditation from the National Cancer Institute, a sign of cutting-edge treatment. There are currently no such designated centers in Louisiana.

“Too often our residents go out for cancer care, to other facilities in the region and out of state,” said Baton Rouge Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome. “This introduces additional financial barriers and isolates our residents from their best support team, friends and family.”

The Institute, made up of a team of 600 physicians, will collaborate with Louisiana State University and Pennington Biomedical Research to integrate research and treatment.

Did you miss the press conference? You can watch the live stream here.

Copyright 2021 WRKF. To learn more, visit WRKF.

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ClassWallet Achieves Significant Growth in Fiscal Year 2021 with 700% Increase in Business and Triple-Digit Increases in Transaction Volume and Revenue https://woodrosealumnae.org/classwallet-achieves-significant-growth-in-fiscal-year-2021-with-700-increase-in-business-and-triple-digit-increases-in-transaction-volume-and-revenue/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/classwallet-achieves-significant-growth-in-fiscal-year-2021-with-700-increase-in-business-and-triple-digit-increases-in-transaction-volume-and-revenue/ MIAMI, October 4, 2021 / PRNewswire / – ClassWallet, the leading digital wallet technology for K-12 education, saw record growth in fiscal year 2021 ending July 31 with a more than seven-fold increase in gross activity, triple-digit growth in transaction volume and revenue, a significant number of federal, state and district contracts and a nearly […]]]>

MIAMI, October 4, 2021 / PRNewswire / – ClassWallet, the leading digital wallet technology for K-12 education, saw record growth in fiscal year 2021 ending July 31 with a more than seven-fold increase in gross activity, triple-digit growth in transaction volume and revenue, a significant number of federal, state and district contracts and a nearly tripled staff requiring a move to a larger seat.

The private company, based in Hollywood, florida and founded in 2014, is quickly becoming a de facto standard in the education market. Used by 13 state agencies and 3,900 schools in 23 states serving 2.5 million students, the innovative accounts payable solution and digital wallet technology manages classroom supplies and facility maintenance purchases , emergency funding and scholarship programs. ClassWallet manages accounts payable funds through its patented fintech platform and digital wallet technology, for teacher and maintenance staff expenses, as well as for the management and disbursement of federal and state scholarships and family grants , schools and districts.

In fiscal year 2021, the company recorded more than $ 750 million in business, representing 700% year-over-year growth from 2020. Transaction volume increased 272% with business processing $ 227 million in payments for its customers. Net income tripled from the previous year.

“We are delighted that our technology and core solutions are recognized as best in class by federal and state agencies as well as school districts across the United States,” said Jamie Rosenberg, CEO and Co-Founder, ClassWallet. “Our growth and success should be measured by more than just our finances – in many ways, we help school districts and government agencies achieve better education outcomes by solving the challenges of distributing funds, spending accounts payable and transparent reporting in a way that was not previously possible. “

Product extension

Over the past year, the company launched two new products to join its TeacherWallet and MaintenanceWallet digital portfolios for teachers and maintenance / curatorial staff, respectively.

Its FamilyWallet solution leverages ClassWallet’s expense management platform to provide virtual wallets to grantees and scholarship recipients, enabling them to pay for tuition, goods and services. The solution has been adopted by seven States dealing with approximately $ 150 million in funds for its clients in Arizona, Idaho, New Hampshire, Georgia, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Texas.

SchoolWallet was also introduced in the last fiscal year, which allows state education agencies to manage funding grants for public and non-public schools. SchoolWallet allows state administrators to centralize grant distribution, tracking, and reporting in one place without the complicated paperwork typically associated with such responsibilities. SchoolWallet contracts have been received from six states providing grants under the Emergency Assistance to Non-Public Schools (EANS) program.

Patents and Certifications

The company enriched its intellectual property with the granting of its second patent (US 11,032,153 B2) on June 8, 2021. The new patent supports the company’s first patent (US 10, 122, 648 B2) issued on November 6, 2018, which covers the disbursement mechanism of its digital wallet and the ability for an end user to receive funding allocations from one or more entities while allowing disbursement entities to track and report on the use of those funds .

“Collectively, the patents cover ClassWallet’s ability to allocate funds, for multiple clients, to end users, set certain restrictions on the use of those funds, and cover the reporting functionality that provides information and tracking capabilities to end users. users, ”said Neil steinhardt, president and co-founder, ClassWallet.

Additionally, ClassWallet achieved SOC 2 Type II certification as a compliant service provider in fiscal year 2021 from the American Institute of CPAs.

Investment in human capital

Beyond contracts, products and technology, a critical aspect of the company’s success in fiscal 2021 was its growing team of employees. Entering the year with just 29 employees, the company nearly tripled its workforce to 79 by adding staff in customer service, account management, sales and marketing roles, including hiring its staff. Senior Vice President of Marketing, Karen nelson, and Bryan coble as vice president, sales. The growth has been so rapid that ClassWallet has outgrown its current headquarters and will be relocating to a larger facility in the same building to accommodate its extended team.

“We are grateful to our wonderful, hardworking and dedicated staff who worked long hours, primarily from home during the pandemic, to manage all of our internal and customer-centric operations – even though our volume has grown monumental,” said Rosenberg said. “They held up as our customer base grew by 50% and our user base jumped almost 50% to 140,840. We look forward to our team meeting again in our new offices at the start. November.”

ClassWallet also opened a sales and marketing office at Raleigh, North Carolina; employs a call center at El Salvador; and works with software engineers and developers in central America and Eastern Europe.

The future is bright

Throughout its growth, ClassWallet remains focused on its mission to support and propel the goals of education. He works hard to support teacher empowerment in the classroom and brings his own brand of entrepreneurship that allows the company to be flexible and extremely agile.

“No matter how we grow, ClassWallet will always remain focused on supporting K-12 leaders with our technology that helps them create major efficiencies in the way they work. The key should be on the student learning, and we can give them more time to come back and do just that, ”said Rosenberg.

“We will continue to work in partnership with government and school districts across the country to help them leverage our platform to solve real problems,” said Steinhardt. “We will continue to explore the use of cutting-edge technologies, such as artificial intelligence, to increase our value equation, but never lose sight of support for education.”

About ClassWallet

Founded in 2014 and based in Miami, ClassWallet (www.classwallet.com) helps K-12 financial leaders save valuable time and overhead by providing an automated accounts payable platform and marketplace for decentralized purchasing. Used by 13 state agencies and 3,900 schools serving 2.5 million students, innovative digital wallet technology is emerging as the industry standard for classroom procurement and education budgets. maintenance of facilities, emergency funding and scholarship programs. ClassWallet has attracted top retailers like Amazon, Office Depot, Staples, Scholastic, School Specialty, Home Depot, Lakeshore Learning and thousands of major merchants that serve the K-12 education market to accept ClassWallet as a fad. of payment.

CONTACTS:

Doug wright / Henri feintuch / Ashley blas
Feintuch Communications
646-753-5711 / 646-753-5710 / 646-753-5713
[email protected]
Media room

SOURCE ClassWallet

Related links

https://classwallet.com/

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The loss of directors is a “critical issue” for nursing home workflow, morale. https://woodrosealumnae.org/the-loss-of-directors-is-a-critical-issue-for-nursing-home-workflow-morale/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 16:12:36 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/the-loss-of-directors-is-a-critical-issue-for-nursing-home-workflow-morale/ Focused Post Acute Care Partners CEO Mark McKenzie is starting to see burnout among his top executives wreaking havoc across operations, with at least three of the operator’s directors having recently left the profession for other industries. McKenzie said the administrator and director of nursing losses has become a “critical issue” for the Burleson, Texas […]]]>

Focused Post Acute Care Partners CEO Mark McKenzie is starting to see burnout among his top executives wreaking havoc across operations, with at least three of the operator’s directors having recently left the profession for other industries.

McKenzie said the administrator and director of nursing losses has become a “critical issue” for the Burleson, Texas company; its highest paid and best trained team members, for the most part, and those with the most experience are leaving the industry altogether and it has been difficult to recruit more.

“When you start to lose these [positions], other problems start to occur. Our industry continues to see a loss of team members within the industry itself, and you are catching it on both sides, ”McKenzie said, referring to a lack of people entering the industry coupled with a lack of people entering the industry. departure of staff.

Eboni Green, a faculty member in Walden University’s Doctor of Healthcare Administration program, says direct care workers and administrators are often inextricably linked to each other – when the administrator leaves , there is a series of certified practical nurses or licensed practical nurses who follow this person. outside.

“I’ve seen this happen a lot, because you build a relationship with the administrator, and sometimes it’s very personal,” Green said. “They understand what’s going on with your kids and your schedule… a change in leadership will not only impact patient care, but it will also impact the lives of staff. “

Green is also a registered nurse and licensed long-term care administrator, and co-founder of Caregiver Support Services in Omaha, Neb.

High stake turnover

Regulatory sanctions and the search for the right replacement can make the loss of an administrator more devastating than that of other institutional staff.

Whenever a director leaves, the operator must communicate it to the state, often triggering an investigation, Green added.

“The staff are already doing extra shifts and trying to make sure residents are meeting their needs, getting the care they need, and now we have to bring in this regulatory body,” a Green explained.

Having a regulator on-site puts additional stress on caregivers, said Green, who is “hanging on to a string” in the first place.

Depending on the state, directors are required to have several years of education before assuming the role, Green explained.

For example, in Iowa, a prospective retirement home administrator must already have a bachelor’s degree in a related field such as business or healthcare before entering a one-year administrator training program.

“It’s more difficult because of the extensive training you need to have on the regulations, whereas when we talk about frontline caregivers, licensed practical nurses, the training is usually 76 to 100 hours of training,” he said. Green said.

Bringing in administrators from different industries is more feasible in assisted living or independent living situations, she said, due to a less regulatory environment.

Money does not go far

Despite an overwhelming number of incentives offered to get directors through the Texas facility gate, the response from applicants has been disappointing, said Reginald Hislop III, Managing Partner of H2 Healthcare.

Login bonus wars are reaching $ 50,000 in an attempt to attract staff to the Dallas, Texas metro market, Hislop told Skilled Nursing News.

“As we see in Texas, it doesn’t matter how much you pay,” Hislop said. “The staff would rather work for each other than for, you know, a $ 25,000 sign-up bonus where they already know they’re going to be forced to work mandatory overtime and 12, in some cases shifts. 24 hours. You try to fill shifts with money. It won’t work, you know, if your environment is harsh and people don’t like working in it.

Hislop said the industry is coming to a point in the workforce crisis where it doesn’t matter how much money is in the equation because there are too many other “core issues”.

“They all said, I’ll watch the industry when [pandemic case numbers] flatten out, ”McKenzie said, referring to early references to flattening the surge in COVID cases. “Since the pandemic, month after month, we continue to see people leaving industry job boards instead of entering. “

Prior to the federal immunization mandate, the flow of applicants to Focused Post Acute was 50% of what it was before the pandemic, McKenzie said. Now that statistic is even lower, hitting 35-40% of what it was last February, after experiencing a brief rise in June.

“At one point, no singular shot was the one that got you out of the industry, it was collecting punches or kicks in the shin or as you mean, to go, ‘today’ hui is the day that broke me, ”McKenzie said.“ We’re starting to see more of these days in the last 60, 90, 120 days than we did at the start. [of the pandemic]. “

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California Hospitals Report Most Health Care Workers Comply With COVID Vaccine Mandate https://woodrosealumnae.org/california-hospitals-report-most-health-care-workers-comply-with-covid-vaccine-mandate/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/california-hospitals-report-most-health-care-workers-comply-with-covid-vaccine-mandate/ A nurse prepares for a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination in California. REUTERS / Lucy Nicholson Kaiser Permanente, Dignity Health, Keck Medicine and other major California hospital systems say they are on track to meet the state’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate, with several citing vaccination rates of 90% or more . California was the first state in the […]]]>
A nurse prepares for a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination in California. REUTERS / Lucy Nicholson

Kaiser Permanente, Dignity Health, Keck Medicine and other major California hospital systems say they are on track to meet the state’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate, with several citing vaccination rates of 90% or more .

California was the first state in the country to announce that all healthcare workers must be fully immunized. The ordinance, which includes doctors, nurses, technicians, janitors and other workers in hospitals, dialysis centers, doctor’s offices, nursing homes, drug treatment centers and other establishments, remains one of the strictest in the country. Only limited medical and religious exemptions are allowed.

On Tuesday, state health officials issued a new ordinance that extended the mandate to health workers in homes, hospices, centers for the disabled and centers for the elderly, but gave them given two more months to comply, until November 30.

Despite predictions that the warrant will lead to serious staff shortages, many large hospitals have told CalMatters they are confident the warrant will not disrupt day-to-day operations. Several large hospitals – with the exception of Sharp Healthcare in San Diego – said they had only had a small number of requests for medical and religious exemptions.

Although hospitals and other health care facilities must follow staff immunization and exemption status, they are not required to routinely report information to the state or the public. According to the California Department of Public Health, a facility will only be reviewed if a complaint is filed against it. At the federal level, disclosure of employee vaccination rates remains optional.

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