Boarding schools – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 12:09:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://woodrosealumnae.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T214900.103.png Boarding schools – Woodrose Alumnae http://woodrosealumnae.org/ 32 32 wife Arlee works to preserve and teach the Salish language | State and regional https://woodrosealumnae.org/wife-arlee-works-to-preserve-and-teach-the-salish-language-state-and-regional/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/wife-arlee-works-to-preserve-and-teach-the-salish-language-state-and-regional/ Indigenous Peoples Day is recognized by 13 states, including Alaska, California and Louisiana. President Joe Biden made history by issuing the first-ever presidential proclamation of Indigenous Peoples Day, which he signed on Friday, October 8. He also issued a proclamation for Columbus Day, which is established by Congress. “For generations, federal policies have systematically sought […]]]>

Indigenous Peoples Day is recognized by 13 states, including Alaska, California and Louisiana.

President Joe Biden made history by issuing the first-ever presidential proclamation of Indigenous Peoples Day, which he signed on Friday, October 8. He also issued a proclamation for Columbus Day, which is established by Congress.

“For generations, federal policies have systematically sought to assimilate and displace Indigenous peoples and eradicate Indigenous cultures,” Biden wrote in the proclamation. “Today, we recognize the resilience and strength of Indigenous peoples and the immeasurable positive impact they have had on all aspects of American society.”

Language revitalization

Speaking Salish was part of Decker’s upbringing, mostly from his great aunts and other tribal elders. At first, she heard the language at winter dances and other seasonal events.

Growing up, Decker attended the Nk̓ʷusm Salish Language School in Arlee where Pat Pierre was his eldest. He gave her the love of the language and helped her to express herself fluently.

“What he said in his speeches was so wise and it helped shape my passion in life,” Decker said. “So since then everything I’ve done has been about revitalizing the language.”


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Uttarakhand recruits English computer scientists for public schools – the New Indian Express https://woodrosealumnae.org/uttarakhand-recruits-english-computer-scientists-for-public-schools-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 05:32:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/uttarakhand-recruits-english-computer-scientists-for-public-schools-the-new-indian-express/ DEHRADUN: The government of Uttarakhand intends to recruit English and computer experts in every public school in the state to strengthen students in both subjects. Banshidhar Tiwari, Director General of Education, said: “This will allow public school students to overcome the hesitations they face in English and computer science. “This will create more than 30,000 […]]]>

DEHRADUN: The government of Uttarakhand intends to recruit English and computer experts in every public school in the state to strengthen students in both subjects. Banshidhar Tiwari, Director General of Education, said: “This will allow public school students to overcome the hesitations they face in English and computer science.

“This will create more than 30,000 job opportunities in the state,” he added. The state government is also considering amalgamating 1,500 schools with other schools. This decision aims to provide better resources for students and teachers.

Ramakrishna Uniyal, Director of Basic Education, Uttarakhand, said: “This decision will create better facilities and infrastructure for students and teachers. This is an ongoing process that will soon be implemented.
On July 31, the Uttarakhand State Department of Education released a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for opening schools, including private and public, day schools and boarding schools.

A nodal officer has been appointed on staff to monitor social distancing, disinfection and other Covid -19 safety standards in schools. Pupils in boarding schools, as well as day schools, are only allowed after obtaining written permission from their parents / guardians within three days of the opening of the schools.

The SOP also states that in the event of a higher number of students, a hybrid education model should be implemented. The SOP includes instructions for vaccinating teachers and staff before entering residential schools as well as ensuring social distancing.


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Opinion: With the restoration of the Bears Ears National Monument, I feel hope for the Indian country https://woodrosealumnae.org/opinion-with-the-restoration-of-the-bears-ears-national-monument-i-feel-hope-for-the-indian-country/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 22:08:20 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/opinion-with-the-restoration-of-the-bears-ears-national-monument-i-feel-hope-for-the-indian-country/ Perez is a registered tribal member of the North Fork Rancheria Mono Indians. She is the former assistant secretary of the California Department of Veterans Affairs, runs a San Diego-based clean energy company, and is a member of the San Diego chapter of the Truman National Security Project. She lives in Vista. “Make sure you […]]]>

Perez is a registered tribal member of the North Fork Rancheria Mono Indians. She is the former assistant secretary of the California Department of Veterans Affairs, runs a San Diego-based clean energy company, and is a member of the San Diego chapter of the Truman National Security Project. She lives in Vista.

“Make sure you let them know we’re still here.”

These are the words my Native American grandmother, a Registered Tribal Elder of the North Fork Rancheria Mono Indian, said to me when I was just 13 years old. To this day, I have never forgotten them.

My grandmother was part of the residential school generation, in which thousands of Native American children were forced to attend residential schools created to strip them of their culture. Growing up in North Fork Rancheria, north of Fresno, my grandmother’s family didn’t have a real home – they lived in an army tent. After colonization wiped out 90 percent of the native population, the Mono people were one of many California tribes whose residents were left homeless after their ancestral land was stolen in the early 1900s.

When I was young, I had no idea how these past atrocities would affect me and future generations of Native Americans. But as I reflect on the America I grew up in, fought overseas, and now raise my son, it’s clear to me that generational trauma doesn’t just live with Native Americans. . He cursed our whole nation.

The past few years have shown us that America needs a deep healing. For our country to advance, we must face our history.

We need to learn and share the stories of our ancestors, including the atrocities that happened. We must recognize that racism, xenophobia and injustice still plague our country.

And we need to do what we can to fix the generational mistakes.

American history begins with European explorers stealing the land from the Taino Indians of Puerto Rico and wiping out the peaceful population of the indigenous peoples. Since Christopher Columbus, generations of settlers across America have committed mass murders, sent Native Americans on forced marches, and displaced tens of thousands of people from their ancestral homeland. America’s true history has been distorted, burned and buried by those who wish to keep it hidden.

But as my grandmother used to say, we are still here.

Native Americans are the original stewards of the land now called America. For centuries we have been the protectors of the earth. Our people are incredibly aware of the impact our decisions could have on our children, their children, and their children’s children. Every decision is anchored in a promise to honor and protect the earth.

This is why the Hopi Tribe, the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, the Ute Indian Tribe, the Navajo Nation and the Zuni Pueblo came together to protect and reclaim the lands belonging to their ancestors. In 2015, these tribes successfully called on the Obama administration to create the Bears Ears National Monument, ensuring tribal stewardship protections and agreements for generations to come.

But barely a year later, the Trump administration dramatically reduced the size of the monument by more than 85%, overturning protections to the land via an unprecedented legal proclamation.

Since then, the region has been threatened daily by vandalism and the development of oil and gas.

During his campaign, President Joe Biden vowed to restore protections for Bears Ears. On Thursday, the White House announced that President Biden will keep that promise and issue a proclamation restoring nation-to-nation relations and tribal sovereignty.

As a Native American woman, I begin to have hope for the Indian country. Less than a year after taking office, President Biden has already installed the Native American First Secretary of the Interior and is now committed to completing the restoration of Bears Ears.

This will enable the reestablishment of collaborative and sustainable land management policies to protect and preserve the resources and treasures of the Bears Ears landscape. Above all, it sends a strong signal that President Biden is ready to recognize the truth of American history and commit to righting the wrongs of the past.

America’s indigenous ancestral lands should be protected. Our ancestors lived, prayed, gathered, hunted and passed on stories to the next generation on these lands. Who better to protect and honor the beauty of Mother Nature and the rich history of these places than the first guardians of the earth?

Despite the darkness of the world, I have high hopes for America’s future because the next generation of young leaders and children are paying attention.

My son, who is both Jewish and Native American, decided for his mitzvah project to educate people on why Native Americans should have the right to protect and preserve their ancestral lands.

The most important goal of his project? To remind people that we are still here.


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Shawnee tribal chief believes children may be buried at Johnson County Historic Site https://woodrosealumnae.org/shawnee-tribal-chief-believes-children-may-be-buried-at-johnson-county-historic-site/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:49:47 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/shawnee-tribal-chief-believes-children-may-be-buried-at-johnson-county-historic-site/ FAIRWAY, Kan. – Shawnee Tribe Chief Ben Barnes believes that a historic site nearly 200 years old deserves a new level of scrutiny. “We know children have died here,” Barnes told FOX4. “We don’t know how many and we don’t know where. “ Barnes made the comments on the grounds of the Shawnee Indian Mission […]]]>

FAIRWAY, Kan. – Shawnee Tribe Chief Ben Barnes believes that a historic site nearly 200 years old deserves a new level of scrutiny.

“We know children have died here,” Barnes told FOX4. “We don’t know how many and we don’t know where. “

Barnes made the comments on the grounds of the Shawnee Indian Mission Historic Site in Johnson County. The historic mission, adjacent to Bishop Miege High School, once occupied thousands of acres. From 1839 to 1862, the mission also served as a boarding school for Native American children from several tribes.

“It was really child labor under the guise of something else,” said Gaylene Crouser of the Kansas City Indian Center.

Residential schools existed across America in the 1800s as part of the federal government’s attempts to assimilate Indigenous peoples. The children learned manual labor and a skilled trade.

Others say mission schools were guilty of “cultural genocide”.

“Because when they got there, they had to change their name. They had to cut their hair, ”Crouser said.

Historians are certain that many children died in residential schools, although very little is known about their remains.

Barnes aims to change that.

“We have to find these kids,” Barnes said. “We will find them. We will name them. We will honor them and give them back.

Barnes said he had the full cooperation of Kansas state officials and City of Fairway leaders. He expects the first steps to involve ground penetrating radar and other sophisticated technology.

“It’s not going to be people who show up with shovels,” Barnes said.

Last spring, the Home Office launched the Federal Indian Residential Schools Initiative. The goal is to end the troubled legacy of residential schools.

“It’s hard to talk about it. It’s hard to think about these kids, ”Crouser added.


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The history of Indian boarding schools in Iowa https://woodrosealumnae.org/the-history-of-indian-boarding-schools-in-iowa/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 01:21:03 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/the-history-of-indian-boarding-schools-in-iowa/ TOLEDO, Iowa – Marian Wanatee said her mother, Adeline, had said little about her experiences at the Flandreau Indian School in South Dakota and the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas.“For me you know it was terrible [that] they would be kicked out of their tribe like that, ”Wanatee said.Wanatee is a citizen of the Meskwaki […]]]>

TOLEDO, Iowa – Marian Wanatee said her mother, Adeline, had said little about her experiences at the Flandreau Indian School in South Dakota and the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas.
“For me you know it was terrible [that] they would be kicked out of their tribe like that, ”Wanatee said.
Wanatee is a citizen of the Meskwaki Nation, a sovereign government of the indigenous Meskwaki people based in a colony in Tama County, Iowa. Her mother Adeline attended a federal boarding school system that was created to assimilate Indigenous peoples into the United States and Canada.
According to the 1928 Meriam report prepared for the Home Secretary, the diets of Indian boarders were “lacking in quantity, quality and variety”, dormitories were overcrowded, disease was widespread, and students were receiving education and support. substandard medical care. The report also said that students above the fourth grade spent half their day maintaining their schools.
Like many other Indigenous residential school students, Adeline Wanatee was forbidden to speak her mother tongue, according to a 1978 book she contributed to and the book Seasons of the boarding school by Brenda Child, professor at the University of Minnesota.
“And, where the Indian people are involved, Anglo-controlled schools, Indian Office schools, and missionary and public schools have openly and systematically sought to destroy indigenous tribal cultures and have tried to impose the culture. anglo “, Adeline Wanatee writes for the book The worlds between two rivers.
Adeline Wanatee continued to advocate for Indigenous rights at the state and national levels, and she became the first woman elected to the Meskwaki Tribal Council and the first American Indian to be inducted into the Iowa Women’s Hall of Fame, according to University of Iowa Press.
“These painful experiences that persist”
On May 27, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation announcement that a ground radar scan at the Kamloops Indian Residential School site in British Columbia, Canada, revealed the remains of 215 students who had never returned to their families. Indigenous News Online reported that over the next two months, other First Nations announcement the detection of an estimated total of 1,093 additional unmarked graves in residential schools across Canada.
“The Kamloops tragedy is a painful reminder of the human rights violations that have occurred in hundreds of US government-run Indian residential schools and churches across the United States,” said the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition (NABS) in a June press release. 7 Press release.
In 1920, the Indian Act of Canada made it compulsory for Native students to attend residential schools, according to the Indigenous Foundations Project from the University of British Columbia. After a thorough investigation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada concluded in 2015 that the residential school policy from 1867 to the late 1990s had suppressed Indigenous languages ​​and cultures, ‘institutionalized’ child neglect and created educational goals that “generally reflected low esteem” for the intelligence of students.
“The door had been opened early to an appalling level of physical and sexual abuse of students, and it has remained open throughout the existence of the system,” the commission said. final report said.
Levi Rickert, Founder of Digital Publishing Indigenous News Online, says he thinks there was a calculation in response to the Kamloops news. Rickert said a new awareness of racial issues that followed George Floyd’s murder has helped revive interest in Indian boarding systems.
Rickert added that accepting these experiences has been traumatic for Indigenous communities.
“Suddenly people are saying it may be healthier to talk about these situations,” Rickert said. “If we are to achieve long-term healing, we need to come out and start discussing some of these painful experiences that still persist. “
“A necessary first step”
On June 22, U.S. Home Secretary Deb Haaland announced the opening of a federal investigation into former residential schools.
Haaland said the investigation would identify known or potential boarding schools and burial sites near schools, as well as the identities and tribal affiliations of the students who were taken there. On September 30, the Ministry of the Interior announcement that he had invited tribal governments, Alaska Native societies and Hawaiian Native organizations to provide feedback for the final report of the investigation and to help the department protect burial sites and other sensitive information.
“Beginning with the Indian Civilization Act of 1819, the United States enacted laws and implemented policies establishing and supporting residential schools across the country,” the Home Office said in a statement. June 22. Press release. “The purpose of the Indian Residential Schools was to culturally assimilate Indigenous children by forcibly moving them from their families and communities to remote residential settlements where their Native American, Alaskan Native and Hawaiian identities, languages ​​and beliefs were to be forcibly removed. . For more than 150 years, hundreds of thousands of Indigenous children have been removed from their communities.
On September 30, a invoice that would create a Truth and Healing Commission on Residential School Policies in the United States has been reintroduced in Congress, according to a Press release from Senator Elizabeth Warren’s office. The proposed commission would investigate and document the experiences, impact and continuing effects of the federal boarding system.
“The work of a commission will be a necessary first step in the healing journey of many generations of Indigenous people who have suffered losses from residential schools,” NABS CEO Diindiisi McCleave said in a statement. Press release of September 30.
Indian training school in Toledo
According to NABS, 367 residential schools were operating in the United States between 1869 and the 1960s. The Toledo Indian Training School was established in the late 1890s about four or five miles from the settlement of Meskwaki, according to Judge John R. Caldwell history of 1910 from Tama County.
As a result of various small-scale attempts to establish schooling for the Meskwaki between 1875 and 1898, demand for assimilation increased around the turn of the century, according to MacBurnie Allinson. 1974 thesis on “Education and Mesquakie”.
In 1895, Federal Indian Agent Horace Rebok organized an “Indian Rights Association”, which argued that “the problem of [the Mesquakies’] civilization is in line with Christianization and education ”, according to Rebok, Caldwell and EC Ebersole report on the association and the Indian Training School of Toledo Boarding School.
“We must break the power and influence of the chiefs and healers before there is any notable progress in the tribe,” Rebok wrote in 1895, according to the report.
In a meeting with Chief Pushetonequa of the Meskwaki, Rebok attempted to convince the chief that placing the Meskwaki children in the Indian training school at Toledo Residential School would be to their advantage, the report said.
“My friend, the Musquakies have always been friends of the Whites, but they will not accept your school,” Pushetonequa replied, according to the Rebok report. “You can come and kill us, but we won’t give you our children. I’m not going to say anything more. “
Despite this, the chief was eventually persuaded to accept the school in open council at the end of 1898, and by June 30, 1899, the total number of students had climbed to 50 students, according to Rebok’s report. According to Johnathan Buffalo, the current director of historic preservation for the Meskwaki Nation, the children had to go to school.
To get more children to attend school, Rebok went to Tama District Court, according to Caldwell. The court transferred guardianship of 20 Mesquakie children to, in most cases, Federal Indian Agent WG Malin, according to the Rebok and Caldwell report. Rebok’s report states that these children were neglected orphans, although Buffalo said the government did not understand the family structure of the tribe.
“Well, when you live in a tribe you always have mother and father figures,” Buffalo said. “They might not be your birth parents, but you still have a grandmother, a grandfather these kids lived with.”
One of Malin’s defendants, a Meskwaki girl named Le-lah-puc-ka-chee, left school without permission, according to Caldwell. Caldwell wrote that an attempt had been made to obtain an arrest warrant against her. On December 29, 1899, a judge ruled that Le-lah-puc-ka-chee could not be compelled to attend school, according to Buffalo and Caldwell.
“The effect of this decision has been disastrous for the school,” Caldwell wrote in his Tama County story. “The older Indians had been intensely hostile to it… When news of the above ruling reached the Indians, the school had practically been depopulated in a day and very few Mesquakie children have attended since then.
Buffalo said Native Americans from other tribes were then brought in to complete the Indian training school at Toledo Boarding School. He said that after the school closed in 1911, the government began sending Meskwaki children to residential schools in other states, including Adeline Wanatee.
“We won the battle, but in a way we lost the war,” Buffalo said. “Because our children ended up being taken away. “


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Albuquerque resolution recognizes residential school trauma | Region https://woodrosealumnae.org/albuquerque-resolution-recognizes-residential-school-trauma-region/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 11:45:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/albuquerque-resolution-recognizes-residential-school-trauma-region/ ALBUQUERQUE, NM (AP) – Albuquerque City Council has passed a resolution that recognizes the lingering generational trauma caused by US residential school policies and formalizes a commitment to work with Indigenous communities toward reconciliation and healing . Councilors voted in favor of measure at a meeting on Monday. Mayor Tim Keller is expected to sign […]]]>

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (AP) – Albuquerque City Council has passed a resolution that recognizes the lingering generational trauma caused by US residential school policies and formalizes a commitment to work with Indigenous communities toward reconciliation and healing .

Councilors voted in favor of measure at a meeting on Monday. Mayor Tim Keller is expected to sign the resolution on Indigenous Peoples Day.

The city has researched the history of a public park where the students of the old Indian school in Albuquerque would have been buried over a century ago. Ground penetrating radar will be used to survey the site and another meeting was scheduled for later this week to discuss how to keep moving forward.

“It’s really kind of a first step for us as a city to move forward towards healing and also to be inclusive of all of our communities in Albuquerque and to understand some of the pain that people are having. have lived over the years without knowing, ”said Board Chair Cynthia Borrego at the virtual meeting.

Indigenous activists expressed concern earlier this year when a commemorative plaque of the students of the old missing school. They established a makeshift memorial of flowers and other offerings and demanded an investigation.

Nationally, the US Home Office is in the midst of its own investigation. The agency announced last week that it would begin tribal consultations as the next step in its examination of the residential school legacy. The comments will help lay the groundwork for future work to protect potential burial sites and other sensitive information.

“Tribal consultations are at the heart of this long and painful process to address the intergenerational trauma of residential schools and shed light on the truth in a way that honors those we have lost and those who continue to suffer trauma.” , Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said in a statement.

In Albuquerque, orange flags have been placed in the city park to signify the significance of the site as more permanent plans are made. Orange is the color used to symbolize the movement that raises awareness of the troubled legacy of the residential school system that sought to assimilate Indigenous youth into white society for many decades.

The Albuquerque Indian School was founded in 1881 by the Presbyterian Church and came under federal control a few years later. The school closed in the 1980s and ownership was turned over to the 19 pueblos of New Mexico. The buildings were eventually demolished and a tribal development company worked to turn it into a mall.

The park is several blocks away. Only part of it is believed to contain human remains, and city officials have said investigative work done decades ago during a road construction project is the only maps they have that detail the boundaries of the old school cemetery.

Dawn Begay, the town’s tribal affairs coordinator, told Monday’s meeting that research at the site so far has determined that Navajo, Apache and Pueblo students as well as tribal students in Arizona were probably buried at the site. She noted that many records have been lost over the years and that one of the goals of the effort is to identify students and their tribal affiliations.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.


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ABQ drivers, be careful. Mobile vans are back https://woodrosealumnae.org/abq-drivers-be-careful-mobile-vans-are-back/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:04:34 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/abq-drivers-be-careful-mobile-vans-are-back/ October 5, 2021 at 5:04 PM On October 4, city councilors unanimously approved a resolution recognizing the city’s Menaul 4-H Park as the historic and sacred burial site of Native Americans. More than 100 bodies of young Native Americans who died while attending Albuquerque Indian School from 1882 to 1933 are buried under the approximately […]]]>


On October 4, city councilors unanimously approved a resolution recognizing the city’s Menaul 4-H Park as the historic and sacred burial site of Native Americans.

More than 100 bodies of young Native Americans who died while attending Albuquerque Indian School from 1882 to 1933 are buried under the approximately three-acre park. Mayor Tim Keller sent the resolution to council to begin the process of reconciliation and healing.

According to the resolution, between 1869 and the 1960s, the residential school policy of the United States authorized the forcible removal of hundreds of thousands of Native American children from their families and transferred them to residential schools. There were five residential schools in New Mexico. The stated purpose of the removal was to “kill the Indian, save the man”, often through physical, sexual, psychological and spiritual violence. Many children fled, some remained missing or died as a result of abuse, illness or substandard health care provided by residential schools. The city acquired the site where the AIS cemetery was located in 1972.

Dawn Begay, the town’s Native American coordinator, gave council an informative report on what the town administration is doing to promote reconciliation and healing. She said the initiative is Native American led with the city and other partners supporting their decisions. The on-site cemetery was created because when someone died at the residential school, many bodies could not be returned to their communities, so they were buried there. Begay said options include ending recreational use of the park and returning the site to a cemetery, among other options.

She said remains were found in 1973 when city workers were setting up an irrigation system. “We have no information on who and how many indigenous children are buried there,” Begay said. The files were lost when they were transferred to the Indian School in Santa Fe.

Begay said stakeholders are working together to find a way forward towards reconciliation and healing. To say that it is time for this unthinkable part of our history to be reconciled is an understatement.

THEBeware of the feet

Speed ​​camera tickets could soon reach your mailbox after councilors approved an order on “automated speed control” that allows cameras to be installed in the city to identify speeding tickets. Leadfoot drivers will receive a civil citation of $ 100 or perform four hours of community service. That should be in place later this fall, according to the city.

Supporters of the new initiative say something had to be done as city drivers struggle to stay within posted speed limits. As Councilor Isaac Benton said, “We have an increasingly aggressive group of people on the streets, and I think we have to deal with that.

Councilor Pat Davis was the only one to vote against, saying a ticket in the mail three weeks later doesn’t stop anyone from speeding up just yet. He added that it’s better to get officers to target unsafe drivers instead of creating a watchdog state that controls profit.

The city has been here before. In 2011, the then city council, which included Councilor Benton, repealed the red light cameras ordinance. But not before more than 50 percent of the city’s voters went to the polls and said “no” to cameras at red lights. Lawsuits were launched, and Redflex, the red light camera company, settled a $ 3.5 million class action lawsuit with Albuquerque drivers.

Mayor Tim Keller said speed cameras could reduce accidents and ease the burden on the police department. He also said that after getting feedback from the community, the city found residents were ready to do something about speeding. Ditto that.

The UNM obtains its fiscal district

A petition from the regents of the University of New Mexico has been approved for the creation of a tax increase development district on the campus of the University of Southern New Mexico. A representative of UNM made a presentation on the maps of the area. The approval describes how the TIDD will operate. TIDD is being set up to do infrastructure in the area, which is located south of the UNM basketball arena between University Blvd. and I-25. Gross revenues and property taxes will go to basic infrastructure needs as well as expansion of science and technology park for more research and development space. There are plans for many quality of life improvements such as parks, plazas and walking trails. This is a unique area, as the 312 acres of land is owned by the UNM or the city and not by private residents. It will be interesting to see this area develop.

Tidbits

The councilors also approved asking the director of the Civilian Police Oversight Agency to provide reports on the training status of each of the nine council members. It seems that some members of the board of directors are struggling to go through a long training course. In a separate vote, they approved Jesse Crawford on the CPOA board of directors.

Others appointed to boards or commissions include T. Zane Reeves on the Staff Council and Leah Nauman (Black) and Tushar Patel on the Tenant Tax Advisory Council.

Moving on to another meeting, councilors carried over a memorial in support of efforts by city, county and state agencies to end the drivers of crime, especially guns and recidivism. They also deferred priority for road improvements on 118th Street from I-40 to Senator Dennis Chavez. And after hearing from a representative of the owner, council deferred the 1804 High Street nuisance declaration.

Mandy’s Farm has been recognized by a proclamation honoring its commitment to helping people with disabilities learn work skills and create inclusive work communities. Discover them on mandysfarm.org

The next city council meeting is scheduled for a Zoom meeting at 3 p.m. on Monday, October 18. Watch it on GOV-TV at cabq.gov or on Comcast Cable Channel 16 or on the city’s YouTube channel.


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Bacone’s basketball players honor 6,509 lives lost | Schools https://woodrosealumnae.org/bacones-basketball-players-honor-6509-lives-lost-schools/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 04:30:00 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/bacones-basketball-players-honor-6509-lives-lost-schools/ Bacone College men’s basketball coach Ruben Little Head sings a Northern Cheyenne memorial song as his players each hold white feathers and repeat “6,509”. Little Head said he and the players filmed a video to remember the Indigenous children who perished in homes in Canada and the United States in the late 1800s and early […]]]>

Bacone College men’s basketball coach Ruben Little Head sings a Northern Cheyenne memorial song as his players each hold white feathers and repeat “6,509”.

Little Head said he and the players filmed a video to remember the Indigenous children who perished in homes in Canada and the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

“Watching my basketball team come up, it really got me thinking about all the different bloodlines they represent,” said Little Head, a member of the Northern Cheyenne. “I have a lot of diversity on my basketball team, and I also have a lot of intertribal members who represent 19 nations.”

The number 6,509 is commonly used to refer to First Nations children buried in anonymous graves at residential school sites in Canada. According to a September 29 article on the Société Radio-Canada (CBC) website, CBC News was unable to verify how many children died in schools.

The Canadian government has declared September 30 a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, in honor of lost Indigenous children and residential school survivors. The United States has joined the effort.

Little Head said he made the video Thursday to mark the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. He said his mother attended Flandreau Indian School in South Dakota.

Team member Blaine Baldridge shot the video, Little Head said, adding that they only needed one take. The teammates stood along the sidewalk leading to the Bacone College Chapel.

Bacone College noted the effort in a statement.

“The recent and very disturbing information from former boarding schools across the Indian country tells a very real and dark story of what our ancestors faced and the cause of the trauma that many of our people can still carry. to date, ”said Bacone Public Relations Manager Rita Courtwright. “The truth about boarding school policy in the United States is a story that is not often told, including the treatment of American Indians. The government has used boarding schools to assimilate American Indians against their will. “

Bacone President Ferlin Clark said Bacone is in a period of transformation, “where we seek to become a public tribal college with the Bureau of Indian Education while respectfully acknowledging the history of the church and our school. “.

“The evolution of our college to Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCU) status is a form of redress and social justice,” Clark said. “Our current mission is to integrate indigenous philosophy, language, culture and arts.”

D’Von LaPointe, a member of Team Warrior from the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, said he hoped the video would raise awareness “not only in the Indian country, but the whole of the United States.”

“It’s amazing to see everyone that day supporting each other and that every child mattered,” said LaPointe. It was amazing to be a part of it. “

Little Head said he wanted his basketball players, who are mostly indigenous, to appreciate their heritage.

“As a head coach, I want them to have the education and at the same time, I want them to have the appreciation. I want them to just have the knowledge of history, so that they know who they are and where they are from, “he said. “In return, I hope that by having this history and knowledge, they can better make better choices in life because of the opportunity and the life they have.”

He said native students probably make up 90 percent of his team, but the team also has Caucasian and black players.

“With that, I want them to really understand the lineage, where they’re from,” Little Head said. “As a father and a coach, I want them to really enjoy life.”


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CATS opens new arts campus in China https://woodrosealumnae.org/cats-opens-new-arts-campus-in-china/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 12:05:42 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/cats-opens-new-arts-campus-in-china/ The new campus of the Cambridge School of Visual & Performing Arts in the Baoshan District of Shanghai will accommodate up to 800 students and provide a pathway to art and design, theater and music programs. “We have seen an increasing demand for high quality services in the country in China” “We have seen an […]]]>

The new campus of the Cambridge School of Visual & Performing Arts in the Baoshan District of Shanghai will accommodate up to 800 students and provide a pathway to art and design, theater and music programs.

“We have seen an increasing demand for high quality services in the country in China”

“We have seen an increasing demand for high quality service in the country in China,” Chris Stacey, CEO of CATS Global Schools noted.

“Despite the global pandemic and travel restrictions, students still want to experience an international education. In addition to benefiting from a rich arts-based curriculum, students at CSVPA China focus on developing their critical analytical, entrepreneurial and human skills to prepare for the world of tomorrow.

The school welcomed its first Chinese and foreign students in September.

Grade 10 and 11 students, ages 14-16, complete a British or American arts program taught in English on campus for two years, before completing high school at CATS Global Schools in the UK or the States -United.

“It is important, more than ever in the current climate, that students in China have the opportunity to experience an international education, and they can do so in the country on a campus with exceptional facilities and ‘first class education before moving to the UK. / US to finish high school, ”added Stacey.

At the school’s extracurricular Perfume DIY Club, students blend their own unique scents by researching and experimenting with raw materials. Photo: CATS

Besides the Perfume DIY club, extracurricular activities include K-Pop dancing, design, table tennis, bioengineering, and computer science.

The new 19,000 square meter campus replaces the former smaller school which was based in the Minhang district of Shanghai. The new school joins CATS’s other campus in Shanghai’s Pudong District, where students follow an academic program, as opposed to an arts-based program.

With 16 institutions comprising independent boarding schools, the School of the Arts, English schools and a variety of summer programs in the UK, US, Canada and China, CATS offers education and training to some 18,000 students each year.


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Healing event held to deal with Indigenous child deaths in residential schools – Colorado news, weather and sports https://woodrosealumnae.org/healing-event-held-to-deal-with-indigenous-child-deaths-in-residential-schools-colorado-news-weather-and-sports/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 23:31:22 +0000 https://woodrosealumnae.org/healing-event-held-to-deal-with-indigenous-child-deaths-in-residential-schools-colorado-news-weather-and-sports/ Colorado Buffaloes head coach Karl Dorrell rams CBS4 cameraman after USC game at Folsom FieldThe Buffaloes’ head football coach has come under fire for pushing one of CBS4’s sports journalists after the team’s loss to the Trojans. 6 hours ago October arrives with very nice weatherWatch Dave Aguilera’s forecast 9 hours ago The Carousel Ball […]]]>

Colorado Buffaloes head coach Karl Dorrell rams CBS4 cameraman after USC game at Folsom FieldThe Buffaloes’ head football coach has come under fire for pushing one of CBS4’s sports journalists after the team’s loss to the Trojans.

October arrives with very nice weatherWatch Dave Aguilera’s forecast

The Carousel Ball raises funds for the Barbara Davis Center for DiabetesThe Carousel Ball takes place Saturday night at the Hyatt Regency Denver.

Walk For Wishes takes on new meaning for kids this yearThe Wish Walk benefits Make-A-Wish Colorado, which grants wishes for children with serious illnesses.

Colorado Jazz Legend Celebrates 101st Birthday at Red Rocks AmphitheaterThe Colorado Music Hall of Fame was visited by its oldest inductee on Saturday.

All-inclusive music school opens in ColoradoThe owners of Deeply Rooted Music School wanted to create a safe and inclusive music community after being frustrated by the current music education climate.

Healing event organized to deal with Indigenous child deaths in residential schoolsFor the first time, the Denver Indian Family Resource Center hosted a Healing Celebration at the University of Denver to honor the lives lost in Residential Schools.

The party at the hotel in Aurora turns deadly; 1 man killed, 3 hospitalizedA party at an Aurora hotel turned out to be fatal on Saturday morning. Aurora Police responded to the Hyatt House hotel near East Colfax Avenue and Peoria Street around 2 a.m.

Crash Kills 2, including a child, on I-25 near WellingtonThe southbound lanes of Interstate 25 north of Wellington reopened Friday night after being closed for hours due to a fatal crash.

Denver school of rock remembers fatal stabbing victimThe owner of the Denver School of Rock said Jennifer Gelvin’s death was a loss not only to her children, but to the entire music community.

The Colorados fill the stages of the State Capitol in the fight for women’s rightsThousands of people gathered outside the Colorado State Capitol building on Saturday to show their support for everyone’s right to reproductive freedom.

Teenager on off-road motorcycle dies after crashing sedan in AuroraA 17-year-old boy died while riding an off-road motorcycle on Havana Street in Aurora, police said.

The party at the hotel in Aurora turns deadly; 1 man killed, 3 hospitalizedA party at an Aurora hotel turned out to be fatal on Saturday morning. Aurora Police responded to the Hyatt House hotel near East Colfax Avenue and Peoria Street around 2 a.m.

Update from CBS4 10-2-21CBS4 is Colorado’s news channel

First weekend of October mostly sunny and mild temperaturesWatch Callie Zanandrie’s forecast.

Update from CBS4 10-2-21CBS4 is Colorado’s news channel

Ptarmigan fire burns in Summit County, 20% contained Friday nightThe teams have a 20% containment on the 85-acre Ptarmigan fire that is burning in Summit County.

Colorado Congressman Joe Neguse helps ease emotional and financial burden on Wildland firefightersLong hours and high stress cause an increase in mental illnesses and suicides among federal wildland firefighters.

Denver Zoo memorial to Alonzo Ashley, who died 10 years ago after meeting with policeThe zoo unveiled a new area on Friday and dedicated it to Alonzo Ashley, who died on a hot day in July 2011.

Fatal crash closes southbound lanes of I-25 north of WellingtonThe southbound lanes of Interstate 25 north of Wellington were closed Friday night due to a fatal accident.

More than 200 residents of Denver apartment complex claim unlivable conditions with cockroaches and black moldMore than 200 tenants at an apartment complex in Denver are desperate to move out, but many cannot afford it.

Strike highlights labor shortages at Denver International AirportThe airport has been hit by labor shortages on many fronts.

Boulder Valley school district faces shortage of substitute teachersThe Boulder Valley School District is experiencing a shortage of substitute teachers.

Highway 6 reopens west of Golden after landslideHighway 6 west of Golden reopened at dawn on Friday morning after a landslide in Clear Creek Canyon.


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